A history and overview of the camera

History of film A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between and

A history and overview of the camera

Early years, — Origins The illusion of motion pictures is based on the optical phenomena known as persistence of vision and the phi phenomenon. The first of these causes the brain to retain images cast upon the retina of the eye for a fraction of a second beyond their disappearance from the field of sight, while the latter creates apparent movement between images when they succeed one another rapidly.

Together these phenomena permit the succession of still frames on a motion-picture film strip to represent continuous movement when projected at the proper speed traditionally 16 frames per second for silent films and 24 frames per second for sound films.

Before the invention of photography, a variety of optical toys exploited this effect by mounting successive phase drawings of things in motion on the face of a twirling disk the phenakistoscopec. As photography was innovated and refined over the next few decades, it became possible to replace the phase drawings in the early optical toys and devices with individually posed phase photographs, a practice that was widely and popularly carried out.

There would be no true motion pictures, however, until live action could be photographed spontaneously and simultaneously. This required a reduction in exposure time from the hour or so necessary for the pioneer photographic processes to the one-hundredth and, ultimately, one-thousandth of a second achieved in It also required the development of the technology of series photography by the British American photographer Eadweard Muybridge between and During that time, Muybridge was employed by Gov.

Leland Stanford of California, a zealous racehorse breeder, to prove that at some point in its gallop a running horse lifts all four hooves off the ground at once. Conventions of 19th-century illustration suggested otherwise, and the movement itself occurred too rapidly for perception by the naked eye, so Muybridge experimented with multiple cameras to take successive photographs of horses in motion.

Finally, inhe set up a battery of 12 cameras along a Sacramento racecourse with wires stretched across the track to operate their shutters. Marey invented the chronophotographic gun, a camera shaped like a rifle that recorded 12 successive photographs per second, in order to study the movement of birds in flight.

These images were imprinted on a rotating glass plate later, paper roll filmand Marey subsequently attempted to project them.

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Like Muybridge, however, Marey was interested in deconstructing movement rather than synthesizing it, and he did not carry his experiments much beyond the realm of high-speed, or instantaneous, series photography.

Muybridge and Marey, in fact, conducted their work in the spirit of scientific inquiry; they both extended and elaborated existing technologies in order to probe and analyze events that occurred beyond the threshold of human perception.

Those who came after would return their discoveries to the realm of normal human vision and exploit them for profit. In in Newark, New Jerseyan Episcopalian minister named Hannibal Goodwin developed the idea of using celluloid as a base for photographic emulsions.

The inventor and industrialist George Eastmanwho had earlier experimented with sensitized paper rolls for still photography, began manufacturing celluloid roll film in at his plant in Rochester, New York.

This event was crucial to the development of cinematography: It remained for someone to combine the principles embodied in the apparatuses of Muybridge and Marey with celluloid strip film to arrive at a viable motion-picture camera. Such a device was created by French-born inventor Louis Le Prince in the late s.

He shot several short films in Leeds, England, inand the following year he began using the newly invented celluloid film. He was scheduled to show his work in New York City inbut he disappeared while traveling in France. Instead it was William Kennedy Laurie Dicksonworking in the West OrangeNew Jersey, laboratories of the Edison Company, who created what was widely regarded as the first motion-picture camera.

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Seeking to provide a visual accompaniment to the phonograph, Edison commissioned Dickson, a young laboratory assistant, to invent a motion-picture camera in Building upon the work of Muybridge and Marey, Dickson combined the two final essentials of motion-picture recording and viewing technology.

These were a device, adapted from the escapement mechanism of a clock, to ensure the intermittent but regular motion of the film strip through the camera and a regularly perforated celluloid film strip to ensure precise synchronization between the film strip and the shutter.

Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Edison National Historic Site Dickson was not the only person who had been tackling the problem of recording and reproducing moving images. Inventors throughout the world had been trying for years to devise working motion-picture machines.

Early years, 1830–1910 They might be added at a later time, but for now they can be summarized as follows. The MD variants are essentially "Documentation" cameras and do not feature a rangefinder or viewfinder.
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In fact, several European inventors, including the Englishman William Friese-Greeneapplied for patents on various cameras, projectors, and camera-projector combinations contemporaneously or even before Edison and his associates did. Because Edison had originally conceived of motion pictures as an adjunct to his phonograph, he did not commission the invention of a projector to accompany the Kinetograph.

Rather, he had Dickson design a type of peep-show viewing device called the Kinetoscopein which a continuous foot metre film loop ran on spools between an incandescent lamp and a shutter for individual viewing. In April of that year the first Kinetoscope parlour was opened in a converted storefront in New York City.

The parlour charged 25 cents for admission to a bank of five machines. Kinetoscope, invented by Thomas A. The syndicate of Maguire and Baucus acquired the foreign rights to the Kinetoscope in and began to market the machines.

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Edison opted not to file for international patents on either his camera or his viewing device, and, as a result, the machines were widely and legally copied throughout Europe, where they were modified and improved far beyond the American originals.

It was given its first commercial demonstration on Dec. This naturally affected the kinds of films that were made with each machine: In both cases, however, the films themselves were composed of a single unedited shot emphasizing lifelike movement; they contained little or no narrative content.

In the United States the Kinetoscope installation business had reached the saturation point by the summer ofalthough it was still quite profitable for Edison as a supplier of films.

Raff and Gammon persuaded Edison to buy the rights to a state-of-the-art projector, developed by Thomas Armat of Washington, D.Gentex is a global, high technology electronics company that is managed by engineers and others who understand the freedom and discipline that's required to run an entrepreneurial company.

Crime and Gangster Films are developed around the sinister actions of criminals or gangsters, particularly bankrobbers, underworld figures, or ruthless hoodlums who operate outside the law, stealing and violently murdering their way through life.

In the s, a new type of crime thriller emerged, more dark and cynical - see the section .

A history and overview of the camera

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Greatest Visual-Special Effects (F/X) Milestones in Film History: From even its earliest days, films have used visual magic ("smoke and mirrors") to produce illusions and trick effects that have startled audiences.

In fact, the phenomenon of persistence of vision (it was first described to some degree in by British physician Peter Mark Roget) is . Jan 03,  · This photography overview explores the history of cameras and explains how a camera works. This photography overview explores the history of cameras and explains how a .

A flip book is a collection of combined pictures intended to be flipped over to give the illusion of movement and create an animated sequence from a .

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